I Love English Week 7 (2016/2017)

Quote of the week:

“Each New Year, we have before us a brand new book containing 365 blank pages. Let us fill them with all the forgotten things from last year - the words we forgot to say, the love we forgot to show, and the charity we forgot to offer.”- Peggy Toney Horton

Idiom of the week:   a new lease of life

Saying of the week:    People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones

Phrasal Verb of the week:    bring about

 

Quote of the week:

“Each New Year, we have before us a brand new book containing 365 blank pages. Let us fill them with all the forgotten things from last year - the words we forgot to say, the love we forgot to show, and the charity we forgot to offer.”- Peggy Toney Horton

Idiom of the week:

a new lease of life

Meaning: If someone has a new lease of life, they have a new enthusiasm for living.

For example:

  • After recovering from her illness, Kathy had a new lease of life and made lots of plans for the future.
  • When my uncle quit drinking it gave him a new lease of life and he started doing things he hadn't done for years.

Note: The variation "a new lease on life" is used in American English.

 Saying of the week:

People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones

 

Possible interpretation: This saying warns us against hypocrisy. We should not criticize other people for things we do ourselves.

 

Phrasal verb of the week:  bring about

Meaning: If you bring about something, you cause it to happen or you make it happen.

Synonym: make happen, cause

For example:

  • bring about sth The greed of a few people in the financial world brought about the global financial crisis.
  • bring sth about The president wanted reform of the healthcare system but he wasn't sure how to bring it about.

Nouns often used as objects with bring about: change, reform, recovery, improvement, development; collapse, crisis, decline, demise, failure