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I Love English Week 8 (2016/2017)

Quote of the week:

“It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all - in which case, you fail by default.” J.K. Rowling

Idiom of the week:   the back of beyond | the back of the beyond

Saying of the week:    Once bitten, twice shy

Phrasal Verb of the week:    bring about

 

 


Quote of the week:

“It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all - in which case, you fail by default.” J.K. Rowling

Idiom of the week:

the back of beyond | the back of the beyond

Meaning: You can say a place is in the back of beyond, or the back of the beyond, if it′s very far from towns or cities.

For example:

  • Why do you want to live way out in the desert? It′s in the back of beyond.
  • Ivan went to visit his cousins in a tiny village in the back of the beyond. It took him a long time to get there.

Note: "The back of beyond" is used more in British and Australian English, while "the back of the beyond" is used more in American English.

 Saying of the week:

Once bitten, twice shy

Possible interpretation: If an animal (such as a dog) bites you one time, you will be extra careful the next time. This saying talks about learning from our mistakes.

Note: once (adverb) = one time | twice (adverb) = two times | shy (adj.) = reserved; timid; reluctant | Also: "Once bit, twice shy" and "Once burned, twice shy"

 

Phrasal verb of the week:

 take out (1)

Meaning: If you take somebody out, you invite them to go out with you, usually for a meal or entertainment.

For example:

  • take sb out Why don′t we ask Uncle Bill to take the kids out for the day?
  • take sb out for sth The manager is taking all the office workers out for a meal tonight.