Zespół Szkół Ogólnokształcących nr 1 w Gorzowie Wielkopolskim  
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I Love English Week 8 (2016/2017)

Quote of the week:

“It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all - in which case, you fail by default.” J.K. Rowling

Idiom of the week:   the back of beyond | the back of the beyond

Saying of the week:    Once bitten, twice shy

Phrasal Verb of the week:    bring about

 

 


I Love English Week 7 (2016/2017)

Quote of the week:

“Each New Year, we have before us a brand new book containing 365 blank pages. Let us fill them with all the forgotten things from last year - the words we forgot to say, the love we forgot to show, and the charity we forgot to offer.”- Peggy Toney Horton

Idiom of the week:   a new lease of life

Saying of the week:    People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones

Phrasal Verb of the week:    bring about

 

I Love English Week 6 (2016/2017)

Quote of the week:

“Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower.” Albert Camus

Idiom of the week:   take with a grain of salt | take with a pinch of salt

Saying of the week:    Jack of all trades, master of none

Phrasal Verb of the week:    get by


I Love English Week 5 (2016/2017)

Quote of the week:

“The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.”  Socrates

Idiom of the week:   nothing to write home about

Saying of the week:    Ignorance of the law is no excuse

Phrasal Verb of the week:    settle down

 

 

I Love English Week 4 (2016/2017)

Quote of the week:

“It′s better to burn out than to fade away.” Neil Young

Idiom of the week:    lead you astray

Saying of the week:    Least said soonest mended

Phrasal Verb of the week:    see about


Quote of the week:

 

“It′s better to burn out than to fade away.” Neil Young

Idiom of the week:

lead you astray

Meaning: If someone leads you astray, they set a bad example and you behave badly also, or they encourage you to do the wrong thing.

For example:

  • We′re worried about our teenage son because he′s at that age when he could easily be led astray by kids he thinks are cool and who could expose him to drugs or alcohol or other bad stuff.
  • Carlos says advertisements lead millions of people astray and make them waste their lives chasing after material possessions in the false belief that they can′t possibly be happy unless they get these things.

 

 

Saying of the week:

Least said soonest mended

Possible interpretation: When we do or say something bad to someone, a long apology and discussion does not help. In such a case, the less we say the better.

Note: least (adverb): to the smallest amount | mend (verb): repair; fix

Phrasal Verb of the week

see about

Meaning: If you see about something, you make an effort to arrange it or organise it.

For example:

  • see about sth When are you going to see about that job?
  • see about doing sth Mark′s going to see about getting a loan for his new busine

I Love English Week 3 (2016/2017)

Quote of the week:

“Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.”

Theodor Seuss Geisel

Idiom of the week:    off the cuff

Saying of the week:    Many hands make light work

Phrasal Verb of the week:    move over

Quote of the week:

“Sometimes you will never know the value of a moment until it becomes a memory.”

Theodor Seuss Geisel

Idiom of the week:

off the cuff

Meaning: If you speak off the cuff, you speak without planning what you will say beforehand.

For example:

  • She wasn't expecting to win, so she hadn't prepared a speech, but she still managed to say a few words off the cuff after being given the award.
  • The prime minister keeps making off-the-cuff remarks that get him into trouble.

Saying of the week:

Many hands make light work

Possible interpretation: The more people that do a job, the easier the job for each person.

 Phrasal Verb of the week

move over

Meaning: If you move over, you change position to make room for someone or something, or to block someone or something.

For example:

  • move over When Lydia came in, I moved over so she could sit down next to me.
  • move over While I was walking along the path I moved over to let some people riding bicycles go past.
  •  

 

Week 2 (2016/2017)

Quote of the week:

 

“Start by doing what's necessary; then do what's possible; and suddenly you are doing the impossible.” Francis of Assisi

Idiom of the week:

against all odds | against all the odds

Week 1 (2016/2017)

Quote of the week:

“The difference between school and life? In school, you′re taught a lesson and then given a test. In life, you′re given a test that teaches you a lesson.”  Tom Bodett





 
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